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 Montante and Spadone 
William Carew


Joined: 07 May 2009
Posts: 2
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Hi everyone,

It seems the 2-handed sword is finally starting to get some much deserved time in the limelight, with the release of Eric's translation of Dom Diogo's montante treatise (which I have been very excited about for some time) and A&A releasing two types of 2-handed trainer, the montante and spadone.

The 2-handed sword has always been my favourite (and for various cultural, historical and artistic reasons I'm particularly drawn to the Iberian styles) and it is an arm I intend to spend much more time with in future. Assuming it is ok to discuss the Portuguese system here as well as the Italian, as as I make my way through Dom Diogo's work on the montante, I'm curious as to it's similarities with, and differences to, the Bolognese spadone.

Any thoughts from those who have worked with both? I look forward to seeing the discussions on these weapons over the coming years and learning from everyone willing to share their experiences and insights.

Cheers,

Bill

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Bill
COLLEGIUM IN ARMIS
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 Re: Montante and Spadone 
Steven Reich


Joined: 11 Mar 2004
Posts: 585
Location: Arlington, VA
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William Carew wrote:
Assuming it is ok to discuss the Portuguese system here as well as the Italian, as as I make my way through Dom Diogo's work on the montante, I'm curious as to it's similarities with, and differences to, the Bolognese spadone.

Yes, this is the place to discuss the Montante, too. I haven't looked at the Montante material yet, but I just printed it out to bind, so I will be looking at it soon.

Steve
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 Re: Montante and Spadone 
steve hick


Joined: 14 Mar 2004
Posts: 98
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William Carew wrote:
Hi everyone,

It seems the 2-handed sword is finally starting to get some much deserved time in the limelight, with the release of Eric's translation of Dom Diogo's montante treatise (which I have been very excited about for some time) and A&A releasing two types of 2-handed trainer, the montante and spadone.

The 2-handed sword has always been my favourite (and for various cultural, historical and artistic reasons I'm particularly drawn to the Iberian styles) and it is an arm I intend to spend much more time with in future. Assuming it is ok to discuss the Portuguese system here as well as the Italian, as as I make my way through Dom Diogo's work on the montante, I'm curious as to it's similarities with, and differences to, the Bolognese spadone.

Any thoughts from those who have worked with both? I look forward to seeing the discussions on these weapons over the coming years and learning from everyone willing to share their experiences and insights.

Cheers,

Bill


Yes there are similarities, there are little portions of the first assalto of Marozzo that are in the plays. There is no use, yet, of the lugs in the montante material found so far.
Steve
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 Re: Montante and Spadone 
steve hick


Joined: 14 Mar 2004
Posts: 98
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Update, we now have information some use of the ricasso from Resumen de la Verdadera Destreza de las Armas, En Treinta y Ocho Asserciones
Por D. Miguel Perez de Mendoza e Quixada, 1675

Holding it with both hands separated, the right on the recazo, gripping it with four fingers, and the thumb above, which is straight without falling over the rest, and the left hand applied to the top of the hilt, stuck to the pommel. Here, the whole hand has to grip it and throw the thumb above the four fingers that grip by key. (Translation by Tim Rivera)

You use the same attacks as you would we a normal grip with both hands on the hilt. He has for this grip that it is 1/2 a vara (a Spanish yard about 33 inches).

Pacheco has that a montante is 2 vara tall (66 inches) altogether in his Nueva Ciencia y Filosofía de la destreza de las armas, which was published posthumously in 1672 but written prior to 1640.
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